State of Flux (VOY) – The Secrets of Star Trek

Is there a spy on board Voyager? Jimmy, Dom, and Fr. Cory discuss the turning of Seska, the return of the Kazon and their crazy hair, and Chakotay’s vulnerability and self-doubt due to being fooled by a spy in his crew, not once, but twice. And a poison apple.

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A Wizard Clip (Early American Catholic Ghost Story; Early Skinwalker Ranch?) – Jimmy Akin’s Mysterious World

In 1794, a Virginia family began experiencing supernatural manifestations that did not cease until they summoned Catholic priests to help. Jimmy Akin and Dom Bettinelli ask whether it really happened, what could explain the manifestations, whether it was ghosts or demons or both or neither.

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Mysterious Headlines

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Jimmy Akin’s Mysterious World is brought to you in part through the generous support of Aaron Vurgason Electric and Automation at AaronV.com. Making Connections for Life for your automation and smart home needs in north and central Florida.

And by RosaryArmy.com. Have more peace. Visit RosaryArmy.com and get a free all-twine knotted rosary, downloadable audio Rosaries, and more. Make Them. Pray Them. Give Them Away at RosaryArmy.com.

And The Light Series, by Jacqueline Brown, a best-selling Catholic fiction series that will leave you asking “Who would I become if the world fell away?” Enter code MysteriousWorld at jacqueline-brown.com for 10% off.

Storm Warning – The Secrets of Doctor Who

We’ve added the 8th Doctor’s Big Finish audio plays to our rotation of Doctor reviews, starting with Storm Warning. Jimmy, Dom, and Fr. Cory discuss how different the 8th Doctor is from the TV movie, the use of Britain’s dirigible disaster in the story; and the introduction of companion Charley.

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The Passenger (DS9) – The Secrets of Star Trek

The full-of-himself Julian Bashir gets his comeuppance when a criminal hijacks his brain. Jimmy, Dom, and Fr. Cory discuss the similarities to Jekyll and Hyde and to Les Miserables, plus the very different person that 1st-season Bashir was compared to later seasons.

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How to Decode Mysterious Church Father Citations

A reader writes:

Hi Mr. Akin,

I am an Indian Catholic and a huge fan of yours and am addicted to Catholic Answers content. I want to ask you how to verify sources of quotes.

I am currently collecting quotes on the Papacy in the early Church. I’ve got lots of stuff (copy-pasted from internet forums), but I want to be careful?before I use them and see if they are accurate. I’ve seen these quotes being used in apologetic books, but I would like to see the original sources to confirm for myself.

A quote looks like, for example:?Cyprian of Carthage (c. A.D. 200 – 258):

“the Chief or Ruling Church [at Rome], whence the Unity of the priesthood has its source, and to which heretical perfidy cannot gain access” [Epist. lv. ad Cornel. ed. Baluz].

I am not an academic so I don’t know how to work with these. What is this Epist.?lv. ad Cornel. ed. Baluz.? This seems like an abbreviated name, so how do I find the exact title? Also, do you think I’d be able to find the book (even as a translation) online?

Thank you very much for writing and for your kind words. Your desire to look up quotations and verify them in context is very commendable! I wish more people did that!

You may find that not all of the quotations out there (either pro- or anti-papacy) are being used correctly and in context.

The system of citations used for these documents can take a little while to learn, and it helps to know some Latin, because those abbreviations are in Latin.

The citation “Epist. lv. ad Cornel. ed. Baluz” has 3 parts.

 

The first and most important is “Epist. lv.”

“Epist.” is short for “Epistula,” which is the Latin word for “epistle” or “letter”–so you know you’re looking for one of Cyprian’s letters.

“lv” is the Latin number for 55, so you’re looking for Cyprian’s Letter #55.

But letters can be numbered differently in different editions, so what’s Letter #55 in one book might have a different number in another book.

That’s where the other two parts of the citation come in.

 

“Ad Cornel.” tells you something else to help you identify the correct letter.

“Ad” is the Latin word for “to,” and “Cornel.” is an abbreviation for the name “Cornelius,” so “ad Cornel.” means the letter you’re looking for is addressed “to Cornelius.” If it’s addressed to someone else, it’s the wrong letter.

For example, here is Letter 55 in one collection that is available online:

https://www.newadvent.org/fathers/050655.htm

Upon opening it, you might think, “Ah! This is Letter 55, so it must be the right one!” But it’s not. From the opening line, you can see it’s addressed “To the people abiding at Thibaris” not “To Cornelius.” Apparently, the editor of this collection gave the letters different numbers than the edition that was being cited.

 

So, who’s edition was that? This is where the last part of the citation comes in: “ed. Baluz”

“Ed.” is short for “editio”–the Latin word for “edition,” and “Baluz” is a proper name. So, somewhere out there, there was an edition of Cyprian’s letters by someone named Baluz, and in the edition of Baluz, Letter #55 was addressed to Cornelius, and that’s the letter you’re looking for.

Unfortunately, I don’t have Baluz’s edition. You might be able to find it, as it’s probably in the public domain. However, I went another route to find the letter you’re looking for.

I googled “cyprian chief or ruling church letter cornelius” and the first result was this one:

https://www.newadvent.org/fathers/050654.htm

Instead of being Letter 55, it’s Letter 54–one off–in the collection that they have at NewAdvent.org

 

To find the specific passage, I then hit Ctrl-F and searched the letter for one of the keywords from your quotation–“unity”–and in section 14 of the letter, I found this:

After such things as these, moreover, they still dare — a false bishop having been appointed for them by, heretics— to set sail and to bear letters from schismatic and profane persons to the throne of Peter, and to the chief church whence priestly unity takes its source; and not to consider that these were the Romans whose faith was praised in the preaching of the apostle, to whom faithlessness could have no access.

That’s clearly the passage that you’re looking for; it’s just a different translation of it.

Because translations render words differently (note that this one uses “priestly unity” instead of “the unity of the priesthood”), you often have to try searching?on more than one key term to find the right passage. If you’d searched on “priesthood” you wouldn’t have found the right passage. But searching on “unity,” you would find it.

 

If I were going to cite this passage for other people, I would do it like this:

Cyprian,?Epistle 54:14

or

Cyprian,?Letter 54:14

The reason is that I don’t want other people to have the same trouble finding the passage that I did. They probably won’t know what “Epist. lv ad Cornel. ed. Baluz” means. Neither will they likely know how to find Baluz’s edition, which is likely out of print.

But–if I update the citation to read “Letter 54” instead of 55–and if I add the section number 14, I can tell them exactly?where to go in an edition that is easy to find on the Internet. I can even give them a direct link along with the citation (as above).

 

This procedure is what I used here, and variations on it will work when trying to identify other hard-to-understand citations.

If nothing else works, you can always just google key words from the quotation until you find the passage in its original context.

You may be aware of this, but something that can help when googling is using the “site:” tag to restrict the searching to a specific web site.

For example, NewAdvent.org has a lot of documents by the Church Fathers, and so–in addition to your key words–you can add the tag “site:newadvent.org” to your search query, and it will search New Advent only?for the key terms, making it more likely that you’ll find the quotation in a primary source document.

Years ago, when I first started researching in the Church Fathers it took me a while to figure all this out, so I hope it’s helpful to you!

God bless you in your studies!

Ruby Ridge – Jimmy Akin’s Mysterious World

On August 21, 1992, federal agents engaged in firefight on Ruby Ridge, Idaho, that started an 11-day siege of the Weaver family which left a mother and her son dead. Jimmy Akin and Dom Bettinelli ask how the situation started, who was at fault, and how did it all go so disastrously bad.

Help us continue to offer Jimmy Akin’s Mysterious World. Won’t you make a pledge at SQPN.com/give today?

Links for this episode:

Mysterious Headlines

Jimmy Akin’s Mysterious World is brought to you in part through the generous support of Aaron Vurgason Electric and Automation at AaronV.com. Making Connections for Life for your automation and smart home needs in north and central Florida.

And by RosaryArmy.com. Have more peace. Visit RosaryArmy.com and get a free all-twine knotted rosary, downloadable audio Rosaries, and more. Make Them. Pray Them. Give Them Away at RosaryArmy.com.

And The Light Series by Jacqueline Brown, a best-selling Catholic fiction series that will leave you asking “Who would I become if the world fell away?” Enter code MysteriousWorld at jacqueline-brown.com for 10% off.

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The Weekly Francis – 19 August 2020

This version of The Weekly Francis covers material released in the last week from 13 August 2020 to 19 August 2020.

Angelus

General Audiences

Papal Tweets

  • “https://twitter.com/Pontifex/status/1293872426867142657” @Pontifex 13 August 2020
  • “Hope needs patience, the patience of knowing that we sow, but it is God who gives growth.” @Pontifex 14 August 2020
  • “With God, nothing is lost! In Mary, the goal has been reached and we have before our eyes the reasons why we journey: not to gain the things here below, which are fleeting, but the homeland above, which is for ever.” @Pontifex 15 August 2020
  • “Let us invoke the intercession of the “Mother of hope” for all the situations in the world that are most in need of hope, in particular for the population of the northern region of Nigeria, victim of violence and terrorist attacks.” @Pontifex 15 August 2020
  • “If we present our poverty to the Lord, with an existence marked by tears and suffering, but with the tenacious faith of the Canaanite woman (see Mt 15:21–28) then the Lord cannot but welcome our prayer with His paternal eyes and heart. #GospelOfTheDay” @Pontifex 16 August 2020
  • “It is not the wealthy who bear fruit in life, but those who build and maintain many friendships through various ”riches“, namely, through the various gifts God has given them.” @Pontifex 17 August 2020
  • “Wealth can force us to build walls. Jesus, instead, invites His disciples to transform goods and riches into relationships, because people are worth more than things, they are more valuable than any riches we possess.” @Pontifex 18 August 2020
  • “The response to the pandemic is dual: we need to find a cure for this small which has brought the whole world to its knees and we must cure a larger virus, that of social injustice. #GeneralAudience” @Pontifex 19 August 2020

Papal Instagram

Amy’s Choice – The Secrets of Doctor Who

It’s 2020, Amy is pregnant, Rory is a country doctor, and the Doctor is visiting. But is it real? Jimmy, Dom, and Fr. Cory discuss the Dream Lord (is he real?) and the moment in this season when Amy has to definitively decide whether her feelings lie with Rory or the Doctor.

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Where No One Has Gone Before (TNG) – The Secrets of Star Trek

The first appearance of the enigmatic Traveler starts the prodigy Wesley story arc. Jimmy Akin, Dom Bettinelli, and Fr. Cory Sticha discuss the insufferable Kosinski, prickly Picard, and how everyone ignores poor Wes. Plus the story behind Diane Duane’s script.

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Desperate Coup in Japan! (WWII Emergency! The Kyujo Incident 1945) – Jimmy Akin’s Mysterious World

In August 1945, Americans welcomed the news that Japan had surrendered and World War II would soon be over. Yet Jimmy Akin and Dom Bettinelli reveal that a desperate last-minuted coup plot by the military in the face of humiliating surrender almost derailed peace and prolonged the war.

Help us continue to offer Jimmy Akin’s Mysterious World. Won’t you make a pledge at SQPN.com/give today?

Links for this episode:

Mysterious Headlines

Direct Link to the Episode.

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Jimmy Akin’s Mysterious World is brought to you in part through the generous support of Aaron Vurgason Electric and Automation at AaronV.com. Making Connections for Life for your automation and smart home needs in north and central Florida.

And by RosaryArmy.com. Have more peace. Visit RosaryArmy.com and get a free all-twine knotted rosary, downloadable audio Rosaries, and more. Make Them. Pray Them. Give Them Away at RosaryArmy.com.

And by Jacqueline Brown, author of The Light Series, a best-selling Catholic fiction series that will leave you asking “Who would I become if the world fell away?” Enter code MysteriousWorld at jacqueline-brown.com for 10% off.